Monday, May 05, 2008

Kudos to New Scientist's "24 myths and misconceptions" about evolution

New Scientist has a pretty good article on myths and misconceptions about evolution (see Evolution: 24 myths and misconceptions).

They really hit on many of my pet peeves on evolution. Among my favorites:
Many of these fit in well with my Adaptationomics Award which I will start giving out again soon ....

4 comments:

  1. THERE IS A NEW DISCIPLINE:

    The Quest for Right, a series of 7 textbooks created for the public schools, represents the ultimate marriage between an in-depth knowledge of biblical phenomena and natural and physical sciences. The several volumes have accomplished that which, heretofore, was deemed impossible: to level the playing field between those who desire a return to physical science in the classroom and those who embrace the theory of evolution. The Quest for Right turns the tide by providing an authoritative and enlightening scientific explanation of natural phenomena which will ultimately dethrone the unprofitable Darwinian view.


    The backbone of Darwinism is not biological evolution per se, but electronic interpretation, the tenet that all physical, chemical, and biological processes result from a change in the electron structure of the atom which, in turn, may be deciphered through the orderly application of mathematics, as outlined in quantum mechanics. A few of the supporting theories are: degrading stars, neutron stars, black holes, extraterrestrial water, antimatter, the absolute dating systems, and the big bang, the explosion of a singularity infinitely smaller than the dot of an “i” from which space, time, and the massive stellar bodies supposedly sprang into being.

    The philosophy rejects any divine intervention. Therefore, let the philosophy of Darwinism be judged on these specifics: electron interpretation and quantum mechanics. Conversely, the view that God is both responsible for and rules all the phenomena of the universe will stand or fall when the facts are applied. The view will not hinge on faith alone, but will be tested by the weightier principle of verifiable truths – the new discipline.

    The Quest for Right is not only better at explaining natural phenomena, but also may be verified through testing. As a consequence, the material in the several volumes will not violate the so-called constitutional separation of church and state. Physical science, the old science of cause and effect, will have a long-term sustainability, replacing irresponsible doctrines based on whim. Teachers and students will rejoice in the simplicity of earthly phenomena when entertained by the new discipline.

    The Quest for Right is not only an academic resource designed for the public schools, but also contains a wealth of information on pertinent subjects that seminarians need to know to be effective: geology, biology, geography, astronomy, chemistry, paleontology, and in-depth Biblical studies. The nuggets from the pages of Biblical history alone will give seminarians literally hundreds of fresh ideas for sermons and teachings. The ministry resources contained in The Quest for Right serve as invaluable aids that will enrich graduates beyond their highest expectations.

    You will not want to miss the adventure of a lifetime which awaits you in Volume 1 of The Quest for Right.

    Visit the official website for additional information: http://questforright.com

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  2. Lo and behold the NEW DISCIPLINE! A new view of reality based not on cause and effect but on techno-babble and gibberish. All bow your heads to the unintelligible. How could I have been so foolish and believed that "survival of the fittest" was a simple concept when really it is a statement of quantum mechanical reality and electrochemical reactions! The truth will set us free especially if we define it anyway we please.

    One question: why is the Darwinian view unprofitable? It seems to me that many advances in health, agriculture, and materials engineering (just to name a few) have resulted directly from an understanding of biology and evolution. Or is it just spiritually unprofitable? Poor Francis Collins :(

    The subject of the blog entry was, however, quite nice and useful.

    Rusch, D

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  3. A review of the 1st Quest For Right book on Amazon.com:

    The author of Quest for Right, C. David Parsons, presents the first installment of seven potential high school textbooks. Their purpose is to rewrite all of science--not just one or two sciences, but all of them. Some of the things he addresses are the removal of the electron from Atomic Theory, deletion of the Periodic Chart of the Elements from chemistry, the complete revision of the Earth's structure and origin from geology and, because they are the name of mythological gods, he has renamed all the planets and moons to suit himself.

    You would suppose that one who fancies himself a scientist, he calls himself a "Scientist Extraordinaire" in the book, would adhere to the rules of science and present voluminous amounts of evidence to back up his hypotheses. If so, you would be wrong. There is absolutely no evidence presented and likewise not a single reference in the entire First volume.

    As an example of the inappropriateness of these books for high school textbooks, he has included as part of the curriculum the very difficult physics subject of quantum mechanics. How many high school students are ready for a calculus-based subject? It is then surprising that he addresses the entire subject of mathematics with disdain, calling it mathematical incantations, and refrains from using mathematics to any significant degree.

    By his own admission, he bases his entire line of hypotheses upon his interpretation of the Bible. The author, although he has been informed of the historicity of teaching creationism in the schools--in 1982 for instance, the Supreme Court struck down the teaching of creationism for all time by a vote of 7-2, is not dissuaded from introducing his vanity published "Quest for Right."

    His most objectionable undertaking is to rewrite several verses of the Bible. He has changed some of the most poetic verses into very boring, silly prose to suit his interpretation of the Bible.

    http://www.amazon.com/Quest-Right-Vol-1/dp/1602477663

    Rusch, D

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  4. Well, this is what I get when some of the comments (like parsons) get sent to my spam filter.

    Thanks Doug

    ReplyDelete