Sunday, October 05, 2014

All Nobel Prizes in 2014 Will be Microbially Themed: The Microbes Guarantee It

So - last year I secretly created a microbiome based spying system that can transmit the thoughts and emails of people who they colonize.  I introduced this community into all the people on the various Nobel Prize committees in order to get information in advance about their plans for the Nobel Prizes. After getting such information, and discovering that the Nobel's this year were NOT focused on microbes, I then created a microbiome-behavioral manipulation system and re-infected the Nobel committees with this community.  This community forces their host to think about microbes all the time.  All microbes.  All the time.  And thus I am nearly 100% certain that all the Nobel's this year will be about microbes in some way.

Given that, here are my predictions for the All-Microbial Nobel Prizes.

Medicine:
The Human Microbiome and Methods for Studying Microbial Communities.  Should go to Norm Pace and some other people.  Possibly Jeff Gordon.  Possibly Jo Handelsman.  Possibly others.  Depends on how much the microbes in the committees emphasize themselves versus all microbes.

Physics:
Vera Rubin for her work on "Dark Matter" since we all know that the key dark matter in the universe is "microbial dark matter".

Chemistry:
Discovery and characterizing of the mechanisms of CRISPRs.  No clue who will get this but it likely could include Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier and others.

Peace:
Bill and Melinda Gates and their foundation for their work on global health, especially on protecting from infectious diseases.

Literature: Ursula K. Le Guin in particular for her Wrinkle in Time series and its emphasis is on mitochondria.

Economics:
Well, since microcredit has already won an Economics prize, I am not sure how this will play out but certainly it will involve some type of microeconomics.  Definitely NOT macroecnomics. I think the most likely winner here is Esther Duflo because of her work on both microeconomic topics and microcredit.


2 comments:

  1. Actually, A Wrinkle in Time was by L'Engle (the other woman science fiction author with a vaguely French name), not Le Guin.

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  2. Oops. Meant to change that since L'Engle passed away. I had drafted this post with her winning and then realized she was alas no longer with us. So I drafted something about Le Guin instead and then somehow that never made it to the final post.

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